Egypt & Sudan

PCSX (Publication of the 1975-1977 Excavations of the Courtyard of the Xth Pylon) in Karnak

The precinct area of the Amun temple at Karnak constitutes one of the largest religious complexes of ancient Egypt and was the socio-economic heart of the Pharaonic civilization during 2000 years. Understanding its development remains a top priority for Egyptological research and, from this point of view, disseminating raw information about passed, unpublished excavations at Karnak is of paramount importance to researchers...

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Publication of F. Ll. Griffith's Excavations at Sanam Temple, 1912

his grant will fund the much-needed publication of the temple of Sanam in Sudan. Dating to the mid-first millennium BC, the temple was excavated by Francis Llewellyn Griffith in 1912 and is located near the modern town of Karima at the fourth cataract of the Nile. The larger site of Sanam (ancient Napata), of which the temple forms part, was the religious and administrative center of the Nubian state in the mid-first millennium BC. The temple is especially significant among Nubian monuments of this period because of the evidence it offers for the non-Egyptian structure of the Napatan...

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The Amulets of the Kerma Culture

Kerma (19° 36’ 2.89‘’ N, 30° 24’ 35.03‘’ E) is an archaeological site located in the largest alluvial plain of the northern Sudan, upstream of the Third Cataract in Upper Nubia. G. A. Reisner, director of the Harvard-Boston Expedition, was the first to excavate parts of the site, including the cemetery with the royal tumuli and associated funerary chapels, between 1913 and 1916. Later on, extensive excavations were undertaken at Kerma by C. Bonnet from 1977 and, subsequently, from 2002, by M. Honegger. Kerma and the archaeological culture named after it certainly played a relevant role in the... Read more about The Amulets of the Kerma Culture

Amun Sanctuary – Jebel Barkal (Sudan)

Jebel (var. Gebel) Barkal, called “Pure Mountain” by the Egyptians, is an isolated butte on the right (north) bank of the Nile on the SW edge of modern Karima, Sudan, 354 km NNW of Khartoum. Located just below the Fourth Cataract, the hill marked the upper limit of pharaonic settlement on the Nile following Egypt’s conquest of Nubia (Kush) about 1500 BCE. Here the Egyptians founded a frontier town called Napata and a sanctuary to their state god that would become the most important in Nubia. The Egyptians believed that the hill was the residence of a primeval form of Amun of Karnak at...

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Taposiris Magna (Egypt): the Harbor on the Mareotis Lake

Ancient authors (from Strabo to Procopius) as well as recent studies have underlined the economic and administrative importance of the city of Taposiris Magna, located towards the western tip of the present Lake Mariout (or Maryut), west of Alexandria, in Egypt (30°56'21.52''N / 29°31'20.44''E). The archaeological settlement, attested from the 3rd c. BC to the beginning of the 8th c. AD, owes its fortune to its strategic location, between the Mediterranean and the lake, in a prosperous region in antiquity, the Mareotis,...

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The Oriental Institute Nubian Expedition Publication Project (Hosh el-Geruf, al-Widay and the Island of Umm Gebir)

The Oriental Institute Nubian Expedition participated in the salvage campaign in the Fourth Cataract of the Nile occasioned by the creation of the reservoir behind the Merowe Dam, which occurred in 2008. Excavations and surveys were carried out at the gold-working site of Hosh el-Geruf and on the island of Umm Gebir, and all 111 tombs at the cemetery of al-Widay were excavated. Work at the latter site completely clarified the pottery chronology of the Old Kush II (ca. Egyptian Middle Kingdom) and the Old Kush III (Classic Kerma) times, and also clarifies the culture and time period of...

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Naqada Publication Project

The Naqada Publication Project aims to produce a comprehensive publication of the results of archaeological investigations conducted by the Italian Archaeological Mission of the ‘Istituto Universitario Orientale’, Naples, at the site of Naqada, Egypt, under the direction of C. Barocas, deceased in 1989, with co-principal investigators R. Fattovich and M. Tosi. Naqada, or ancient Nubt, is best known for its extensive cemeteries dated to the Predynastic period (c. IV millennium BC). In 1977–1986, archaeological investigations of the Italian expedition focused on the corresponding...

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Tell Edfu: Excavations of the Governor’s residence of the late Middle Kingdom and the granary court of the Second Intermediate Period in Zone 1 (2005-2013)

The ancient town of Edfu is situated on the west bank of the Nile, halfway between Luxor and Aswan. Two names, Behedet and Djeba, are attested for Edfu for the Pharaonic Period. There is evidence for the former from the Old Kingdom onwards. Djeba, however, has its earliest attestation in the Middle Kingdom. This is probably also the origin of the Coptic name, which is Etbo. In the Ptolemaic Period, the town was called Apollinopolis Magna. In ancient times, Edfu was the capital of the 2nd Upper Egyptian nome and thus played an important role within the region. The...

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